Human Rights Research

AIVL’s Anti-Discrimination Market Research Report & AIVL Summary

In 2009 AIVL received funding to commission market research with a view to determining the feasibility of developing a national campaign to redress the stigma and discrimination routinely faced by people who inject drugs. The primary objectives were to learn more about the perceptions of the general community – and some subsections of it, such as the medical profession – towards our community. This new information could then be used in determining how the community might respond to messages aimed at countering the misconceptions and prejudices associated with people who inject drugs.

Download AIVL’s Anti-Discrimination Market Research Report (PDF, 504 Kb) and Market Research Report – AIVL Summary (PDF, 56 KB)


“Why Wouldn’t I Discriminate Against all of Them?” – A Report on Stigma and Discrimination towards the Injecting Drug User Community

 The concerns raised by the market research prompted AIVL to seek further resources in order to investigate in greater depth some of the main findings before embarking on any public education campaign. In particular, we wanted to explore a range of questions from the perspective of people who inject drugs, to ask how current attitudes towards our community have developed over time and left us in a situation where we are almost universally categorised as social pariahs whose lives are of no value. We felt we needed to ‘look back’ and try to pinpoint the origins of many of these views before we could make any meaningful effort to ‘look forward’ and begin the process of challenging and changing the tired narratives about injecting drug users’ lives.

Download “Why Wouldn’t I Discriminate Against all of Them?” – A Report on Stigma and Discrimination towards the Injecting Drug User Community (PDF, 2.3 MB)


AIVL’s Discrimination Survey Results Reports

The Online Discrimination Survey results presented here are from people with varied backgrounds, many experiencing different degrees of discrimination or stigma (all of which just as valid as the other). Some of these have ranged from: people who inject drugs (PWID), people on ORP, and those living with hepatitis C and/or HIV, sex workers, people with mental health issues, and people in severe pain having difficulty accessing adequate medications.We strongly encourage everyone to read these survey results, but particularly:

  • People who have completed the discrimination survey: to see what others have also said about their experiences;
  • People who inject drugs (PWID), people on ORP, and those living with hep C and/or HIV;
  • Anyone working in health and/or service provisions: whose clients’ maybe- people who inject drugs (PWID), people on ORP, and those living with hep C and/or HIV;
  • People wanting to know more about discrimination and stigma in relation to people who inject drugs (PWID), people on ORP, and those living with hep C and/or HIV.

Download AIVL’s Discrimination Survey Results Reports